Story Time Books – 2/22/14

eiffel_tower_at_night_paris_france-normal

After story time last Saturday, a parent asked me whether I thought it made sense to take a 6 month old to Paris.  I instinctively answered, “Good God No!”

Her eyes widened in surprise at my vehement response. So I backpedaled.

“What I meant to say was, it’s really up to you and your husband. But if your in-laws are happy to dote on your son for a week, and it gives you time to reconnect with the hubby, then you should go.  Besides,” I added with a shrug.  “It’s not like he’s going to remember it anyway.”

“No kidding.”

When my partner and I took our three-year-old son to the Azores, we sat in a mud bath, drank raw cow’s milk, saw dolphins and took a carriage ride.

Now 7, he gives us blank stares whenever we mention the trip.  This “childhood amnesia” – as coined by Freud – means that the earliest memories that we can recall start at around the age of 3. Anything before that is a bit of a wash.

So why do we spend so much time and energy on the 0-3 age range? We sing, read, play, coddle, dance, swim and otherwise engage in activities that can be as exhilarating as they are exhausting.

“That’s my nose.  Where is your nose? There it is…yes, that’s still my nose.  Where is your nose? No, that’s my ear. Sweetie, let go of my earring…”

Because we are building a foundation – one that no one will ever see, but without which the structure will crumble.  Maybe through time or environmental stresses or both.

It is this foundation that our children will weather the storms to come.

We are doing more than building people.
We are building our future.

Books We Read

IWantmyhatback
I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen
A read-aloud favorite with fun pictures and plenty of opportunity for silly voices.

BearsSong
The Bear’s Song by Benjamin Chaud
My criss-cross-applesauce book since kids inevitably draw closer and closer to see the intricate drawings.  Who can blame them? The detail is remarkable and the message – adventures are best shared – makes this one a keeper.

Grumpybird

Grumpy Bird by Jeremy Tankard
Grumpy Bird is, no surprise, grumpy. Thankfully he has cheerful friends or this book would be a real downer!

Book: Pezzettino

Pezzetino by Leo Lionni
Existential yet engaging. A “little piece” goes in search of himself. Satori follows.

Fortunately

Fortunately by Remy Charlip
Poor Ned, first a birthday invitation, then an exploding plane. Fortunately, things turn our ok in the end and fortunately, kids giggle at Ned’s ups and downs.

Songs

Old MacDonald
We got a parrot…and a dinosaur…and of course, a cow.

If You’re Happy and You Know It
Of course you were! It was story time! We did clap your hands, stop your feet, wave your arms, wiggle your fingers and give yourself a BIG HUG!

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